Strategy training and attributional feedback with learning disabled students

Author: 
Schunk, D. H., & Cox, P. D.
Year: 
1986

The study explored strategies of verbalization and effort-attributional feedback on student self- efficacy and skills. Grounded in the hypothesis that verbalization enhances learning outcomes, the researchers explored the differential impact of this strategy at various levels of intensity. To explore the impact of effort-attributional feedback, students were provided with varying levels of effort feedback with the expectation that students receiving more effort feedback would enhance self-efficacy and skills, particularly among students with learning disabilities.

Type: 
Research
Common Core State Standards: 
Construct Viable Arguments
Reason Abstractly
Instructional Strategies: 
Thinking Aloud
Supporting Struggling Students: 
Differentiation

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